Musical instruments in Baskeet: Drums

This is another post in the series on Baskeet musical instruments – see earlier posts of this series here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here and here. While there is a significant number of wind instruments (aerophones) in Baskeet, there is only a single membranophone used in Baskeet, a large drum with two useable cow skin membranes. The membranes are laced to each other. The drum is struck with bare hands, one hand on each membrane. The wood for the drum is taken from a tree called koyri in Baskeet, which I haven’t been able to determine yet. The drum comes in different shapes: it can be cylindrical, as seen on the picture below:

Baskeet drum (dibba) (Picture taken in the home of the Dookki kaat)

Cylindrical Baskeet drum (Picture taken in the home of the Dookki kaat)

Usually, the drum is slightly conical or double-conical. The picture below shows a conical drum, with a large drumhead played by the right hand and a smaller drumhead played by the left hand. The drum is played by men and women and accompanies songs sung for happy occasions, such as weddings. Drums are not played during the mourning ceremonies. The drum can be placed on the ground and be played while kneeling.

Irdaato Shannapo with her drum (Dookka-C’ari-Subba, Basketo Special Woreda)

Irdaato Shannapo with her drum (Dookka-C’ari-Subba, Basketo Special Woreda)

The drum can also be hung to the body of the player, as the drum on the picture below, which was played during an orthodox procession on the T’əmk’ät (Timket) holiday in Laska.* Note that the drums played in an orthodox context are coloured and double-conical (with a diameter that is larger in the middle than at the ends).

Drum in an orthodox procession in Laska

Drum in an orthodox procession in Laska

The Baskeet term for the drum is dibba. I have also heard people use karaba, which is probably a deformed Amharic loanword (< käbäro).

© 2011-2 Baskettoethiopia All Rights Reserved
____________________________________
Notes: *Drums are also used during Protestant processions but it is unknown to me which type of drum is used for these occasions.
Acknowledgements: My thanks go to Irdaato Shannapo from the Dookka-C’ari-Subba neighbourhood for sharing her knowledge with me.
Advertisements
This entry was posted in Material Culture, Music, Musical instrument and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s